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Self-Harm Myth: People Who Self-Harm Like Pain

Nnatasha Tracy

It sounds true, but it's actually a myth that people who self-harm like pain. Believe me, you can want to self-injure and hate pain — both of those things can be true at the same time. Read on to learn about the myth that those who self-mutilate like pain. I've done it; I should know.

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Harm minimisation for self-harm: mixed-method analysis of electronic health care records finds it can be helpful

The Social Care Elf

Holly Crudgington reviews a mixed-methods analysis of electronic health records in secondary mental healthcare on harm minimisation for the management of self-harm. The post Harm minimisation for self-harm: mixed-method analysis of electronic health care records finds it can be helpful appeared first on National Elf Service.

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Why don’t people receive a psychosocial assessment in emergency departments after self-harm?

The Social Care Elf

Amelia Talbot looks at a recent qualitative study of patient and carer perspectives, which explores the reasons why some patients do not receive a psychosocial assessment in emergency departments following self-harm. The post Why don’t people receive a psychosocial assessment in emergency departments after self-harm?

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Third of UK carers with bad mental health have thoughts of self-harm, survey finds

The Guardian

Lib Dems call for £1bn support package to improve help for carers through access to respite care and increased carer’s allowance A third of carers with poor mental health have considered suicide or self-harm, data shows.

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Children stressed and self-harming over UK cost of living crisis

The Guardian

Mental health problems are linked to financial squeeze on families, according to new Childhood Trust report The impact of the cost of living crisis on children has led some to start self-harming, a new report by a leading children’s charity has claimed.

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What is non-suicidal self-harm?

Beautiful Voyager

Non-suicidal self-harm means inflicting damage to your own body without the intention of suicide (and not consistent with cultural norms). The most common methods of non-suicidal self-harm are cutting (70%) or scratching, deliberately hitting the body on a hard surface, punching, hitting or slapping one’s self, and biting or burning.

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A fifth of children in care self-harmed during pandemic, research finds

The Guardian

About one quarter said that they no longer had access to any mental health support One in five children in care in England were self-harming and likely to have mental ill health during the Covid-19 pandemic, research published on Wednesday reveals.