August, 2023

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Social Work Tech Talk: I, Chatbot—What Does AI Have To Do With Social Work?

The New Social Worker

Suddenly, everyone is talking about AI.

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‘Stick with social work’: senior leaders share their best advice

Community Care

Community Care’s Choose Social Work campaign, which has been running since June, aims to champion the brilliant work social workers do every day, inspire the next generation of practitioners, and counteract the negative media coverage of the profession. We asked senior leaders to share their best advice for social workers, and why they are proud to be part of the profession.

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Advancing Social Work Praxis: Uniting Communities to Tackle Adversity, Vulnerability, and Trauma

Social Service Workforce

Written by Dr Poppy Masinga, President of the Association of South African Social Work Education Institutions (ASASWEI)

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Children referred to social care twice as likely to fail GCSE maths and English

The Guardian

Research found 53% of teenagers in England who had been referred to services did not achieve a pass in both subjects Children in England who are referred to social services at any point in their childhood are twice as likely to fail GCSE maths and English, according to new research published ahead of results day on Thursday. Analysts looked at 1.6m pupils’ exam results over a three-year period and found that 53% of teenagers who had been referred to social care – as detailed in the Children in N

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5 Must Haves for Case Management

Thousands of nonprofits rely on case management software to help collect data, manage programs, coordinate with agencies, and provide life-changing health and human services. Adopting a cloud-based case management platform is essential for nonprofits and government agencies to operate more efficiently and make better use of their funding and budget.

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When injustice hides in plain sight

NCCPR Child Welfare Blog

The New York Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is examining racism in the New York family policing system (a more accurate term than “child welfare” system). New York’s institutional providers of family defense prepared in-depth written testimony that is a report in itself. As I read it, I had to stop every few pages. Just reading the first-hand accounts of soul-crushing injustice visited upon overwhelmingly poor nonwhite families was tough.

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Educational Assistants in Ontario – Important Report of the OWSIAT

Gary Direnfeld

In July 2023, there was a decision by the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal. The case involves an Educational Assistant seeking leave for Traumatic Mental Stress owing to an incident with a six-year-old boy. The incident occurred in October 2018. The child’s behavior included physical outbursts requiring the other children to be cleared from the classroom.

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Children’s social care gets fifth minister in two years

Community Care

Children’s social care has its fifth minister in two years, following today’s cabinet reshuffle. David Johnston has succeeded Claire Coutinho as minister for children, families and wellbeing , after her elevation to the cabinet as energy secretary. Coutinho spent just 10 months in post , though this was longer than her two immediate predecessors with responsibility for the sector – Kelly Tolhurst and Brendan Clarke-Smith – each of whom lasted two months, amid the turbulen

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Using motivational interviewing in students’ practice learning

Martin Webber

Teaching students to use motivational interviewing in their practice works!

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Blood clots during COVID-19 may be a cause of ‘brain fog’

MQ Mental Health

MQ researcher Dr Max Taquet and his team from the University of Oxford have found evidence that the ongoing cognitive problems that some people experience after contracting COVID could be caused by blood clots. Many people with long-COVID experience memory issues and slowed thinking, often referred to as brain fog. Now we are one step closer to understanding the exact cause.

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NASW disappointed by ruling upholding firing of pregnant Catholic school teacher

Social Work Blog

Y The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) in August 2021, along with 26 other organizations committed to civil rights, filed an amicus brief in the New Jersey Supreme Court in support of Victoria Crisitello. Crisitello was an elementary school art teacher who was terminated by her employer, a Catholic elementary school, after she became pregnant while unmarried.

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Get Connected: Using Social Media for Social Work Success

Speaker: Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW.

You may have the clinical skills to manage a private practice, but your success could actually hinge on marketing skills. For a thriving practice, you need to differentiate yourself from others and present yourself in a way that attracts referrals. These days, much of that happens online, including on social media. In this webinar, Gary Direnfeld will discuss how social media marketing can help you build your private practice and grow your client base.

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Divorcing? Invest in Learning with These Tips

Gary Direnfeld

Divorce always ranks as one of the most stressful life events, often only second to the death of a loved one. With divorce, life as you knew it is thrown up into the air. You don’t know the configuration life will take until those pieces land. To say it’s a wild ride is an understatement. The nature of the person whom your are divorcing plays into that stress.

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Habit Forming and Mental Health

My Brains Not Broken

After writing about high-functioning anxiety earlier this week , I started thinking about habits. Over the course of our lives, we develop habits of all kinds. They can be good for us, they can be bad for us. They can be the thing we need to get through the day, or they can be something we do absentmindedly before bed. Regardless of where they originated from, habits form a major aspect of our day-to-day lives.

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Social work’s public image ‘pushing people out of frontline roles and making families distrustful’

Community Care

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll. Social work’s poor public image is driving people out of frontline children’s roles, hurting recruitment and making families fearful and distrustful of practitioners. Those were among the findings of research with just over 1,000 social workers and managers working for local authorities in London and the South East , carried out by the two regions’ local authority children

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Exploitation and low pay causing poverty among care workers, TUC finds

The Guardian

TUC says urgent investment needed in ‘Cinderella sectors’ to head off demographic timebomb ‘Invisible, endless, relentless’: the reality of care work in England Chronic under-investment, exploitation and low pay is leading to widespread poverty among workers in the care sector, according to damning research from the Trades Union Congress. As it publishes its first workforce blueprint for the care economy, the TUC argues that the “Cinderella sectors” of social care and childcare need urgent inves

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Celebrating co-production

Social Care

Social Care Institute for Excellence: "[We want to see] diversity in co-production practice, broadening the voices heard and extending participation." [Image created by freepik.com ] Looking back at Co-production Week At SCIE , we recently marked the eighth year of our annual Co-production Week , a five day national festival of co-production in action, in which we celebrated and shared good practice in coproduction in social care.

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Contested Disability: Sickle Cell Disease

Social Work Blog

The world’s first “molecular disease,” sickle cell disease (SCD) has captivated the medical community’s attention as a multisystem blood disorder linked to abnormalities in one molecule: hemoglobin. While the molecular model of SCD has led to advances in medical management, its reductionism obfuscates the sociopolitical dimensions of the condition, affording little attention to the racialized, gendered, classed, and disabling disparities faced by people with SCD.

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When Someone You Love has Anxiety…

Gary Direnfeld

For many, there is a relational aspect to anxiety. They seek others to help them manage, make them feel safe or less anxious. They draw others in. Those that get drawn in become part of a dynamic where as they try to comfort, cajole, support, facilitate, the one with the anxiety experiences and expresses greater fear. This causes the helper to increase their supportive efforts.

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Jumping From One Thought to Another

My Brains Not Broken

One aspect of mental health that I think is fascinating is the idea of high-functioning mental illness. I’ve written posts about high-functioning anxiety and high-functioning depression and even though I’ve learned a lot about both over the years, there is still so much to learn. Lately, I’ve thought a lot about how my brain works when I’m experiencing high-functioning anxiety – the way I race to get things done, the pressure I put on myself to finish things by the

Anxiety 130
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‘Why we’re providing therapy for parents in pre-proceedings’

Community Care

By Leigh Zywek and Richard Devine, Bath and North East Somerset Council In our work, we have found that many of the challenges parents faced in safely caring for their children stemmed from coping strategies the parents had developed to handle extremely difficult and traumatic childhoods. This exposed the significant disparity between the support provided to parents and what they required.

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How To Relieve Chest Tightness From Anxiety? 4 Helpful Ways

Blurt It Out

Anxiety is a widespread mental health condition that affects roughly 3.1% of Americans , [1] mostly women. It can occur at any moment throughout a person’s life and is frequently made worse by particular stressful events or transitions. There’s a good probability that in addition to psychological and emotional symptoms, you’ve also had physical ones-especially if you’ve ever had an anxiety or panic attack.

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Putting it on (digital) record

Social Care

"[Digital social care records] have the potential to transform the way in which care is provided." [Image created by freepik.com ] Digitisation for the nation When technology is embedded seamlessly into care and support services, it can be transformative: helping people to live happy, fulfilled lives in their homes and communities. As part of the plans for reform, set out in the 2021 government white paper, People at the Heart of Care , the digitising social care programme is supporting widespre

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Child abuse: The “surge” that wasn’t.

NCCPR Child Welfare Blog

New data from Pennsylvania confirm: When America’s child welfare establishment fearmongers predicted that COVID would bring on a “pandemic of child abuse” it was just the usual health terrorism. The American family policing system, a more accurate term than “child welfare” system, is built on “health terrorism” – misrepresenting the true nature and scope of a problem in the name of “raising awareness.

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Educational Assistants’ Advice to Parents for the Start of School

Gary Direnfeld

Parents: On my Facebook page I asked Educational Assistants what they would like to know about your child and what they would like you to know. There were 175 comments. I read them all. Here is a very brief summary. I will place a link to the original post and comments in a comment to this post for those who would like to read them. It is informative.

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The Learning Curve of Mental Health

My Brains Not Broken

When it comes to my mental health, one thing I can always count on is that it won’t be too long before I learn something new. Sometimes it’s a mental health or psychological term. Other times it’s a phrase, or a more accurate description than one I’d been using. After ten years of living with depression and anxiety, there’s still a lot to learn.

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Chief social worker and adult PSWs issue assessment guidance

Community Care

Chief social worker for adults Lyn Romeo and principal social workers have issued guidance on carrying out proportionate assessments under the Care Act 2014. The guide comes in the wake of Department of Health and Social Care funding designed to streamline the assessment process, including through virtual processes, delegating assessments to third parties and making more use of non-qualified staff to help deal with social worker shortages.

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The Key to Making Actionable Logic Models

Nicole Clark Consulting

Let’s get straight to the point. When logic models are viewed as a valuable planning and learning tool, rather than solely as a grant making reporting requirement, it increases the likelihood that your organization will use them. When logic models are viewed in connection to other tools you have at your disposal, that also increases [.] The post The Key to Making Actionable Logic Models appeared first on Nicole Clark Consulting.

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NHS and Social Care COVID Life Assurance Scheme

Social Care

The NHS and Social Care Coronavirus Life Assurance Scheme provides financial support to families and dependents of health and social care staff who sadly died from COVID-19, contracted while delivering frontline care during the pandemic. [Image created by freepik.com ] Closing soon - don't miss out In our line of work, there are many challenges we do our best to meet – and beat - every day of the year.

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Attn: New Hampshire “Child Advocate” – there are horrendous institutions in your state, too

NCCPR Child Welfare Blog

You shouldn’t be getting “a good night’s sleep” while kids are institutionalized anywhere. If your state didn’t tear apart families at a rate nearly double the national average, none would “need” to be institutionalized. The Bledsoe Youth Academy in Tennessee sure sounds like a hellhole. That’s what New Hampshire’s “Child Advocate,” Cassandra Sanchez, found when she toured the place.

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Couple Counseling: Is It Safe?

Gary Direnfeld

It’s not uncommon for me to decline a request for couple counseling. The reasons typically have to do with safety and/or substance use and/or serious mental health issues. Safety is code for concerns of domestic violence. Risk indicators includes screaming, name calling, breaking of objects, hitting, pushing, shoving, choking, threatening harm, abuse of pets, limiting access to resources, police or child protection agency involvement.

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Remembering to Connect the Dots

My Brains Not Broken

The other morning, I went for a run. I’m training for a half-marathon (my first one ever – please send some positive vibes my way!), so some of my runs are getting progressively longer. This run, in particular, was pretty grueling. It was longer than I had gone in a long time, and included some steep hills that seemed to come out of nowhere.

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AMHPs lack time for ‘extremely important’ pre-assessment work with people in crisis, finds survey

Community Care

Approved mental health professionals (AMHPs) lack time to carry out “extremely important” pre-assessment work that would likely improve outcomes for people in mental health crisis. That was among the findings from a recent survey of 118 AMHPs – the vast majority still in practice – in relation to working with people prior to an assessment of whether the person should be detained under the Mental Health Act 1983.

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Not a single version - of truth or of the report

Learning Social Worker

Statement from Caroline Aldridge, Anne Humphrys and Emma Corlett regarding the BBC Newsnight Investigation in to the Grant Thornton report on Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust’s (NSFT) Mortality Reporting and Recording 29th August 2023 When the ‘independent’ review was commissioned in summer 2022, NSFT’s Deputy CEO, Cath Byford, assured Norfolk Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee that the report would give a “single version of the truth”.

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IFSW hosts side-event during the 2023 UN High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development

International Federation of Social Workers

During the 2023 UN High Level Political Forum (UN HLPF) on Sustainable Development, IFSW hosted a side-event , “Co-building an Eco-Social World for Sustainable Development”.

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Daily Doses of Self-Care for September, Self-Care Awareness Month—2023

The New Social Worker

In celebration of the 7-year anniversary of the Self-Care A-Z blog and of September Self-Care Awareness Month, we invite you to deepen awareness and activation of self-care. Please use our daily-dose-of-self-care calendar for 2023.

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That First Job: Be a Mentor

Gary Direnfeld

My first part time job was selling shoes. I was about 16-years-old. I lasted 3 months. I didn’t know how to sell. I was let go. I crossed the mall and applied for a job at another shoe store. “Sure,” I said, “I have experience.” I was hired, but still couldn’t sell. This manager took me under his wing. He literally taught me how to sell and also how to upsell.